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Racial Justice Resources

   

STATEMENT FROM BISHOP BROWN ON RACIAL JUSTICE AND THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN MAINE

 

  Read a transcript of Bishop Brown's remarks here

 MAINE'S RACIAL JUSTICE COUNCIL

Bishop Brown spoke of the formation of the Diocese of Maine’s Justice Commission in his statement on June 11th. The commission will integrate existing committees and networks, such as Episcopal Peace Fellowship and the Committee on Indian Relations with new initiatives to equip us for the hard work of listening, learning, and joining together to work for racial justice. The creation of the new Justice Commission and a new Racial Justice Council were supported by a resolution passed at Diocesan Convention in the fall of 2020. The chair of the Justice Commission is the Rev. Eleanor Prior of the Cathedral of St. Luke, Portland. 
 

LEARNING ABOUT RACIAL JUSTICE

We are all advised to learn from experts about racial justice. Here are some courses and programs that can help.

  

RACIAL RECONCILIATION

Visit The Episcopal Church's Racial Reconciliation webpage here.

 

ABSALOM JONES CENTER FOR RACIAL HEALING

Visit the Absalom Jones Center for Racial Healing website for resources, news and events. 

 

SACRED GROUND: A FILM-BASED DIALOGUE SERIES ON RACE & FAITH

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Sacred Ground is a film- and readings-based dialogue series on race, grounded in faith. Small groups are invited to walk through chapters of America’s history of race and racism, while weaving in threads of family story, economic class, and political and regional identity.
 
The 10-part series is built around a powerful online curriculum of documentary films and readings that focus on Indigenous, Black, Latino, and Asian/Pacific American histories as they intersect with European American histories.
 
Sacred Ground is part of Becoming Beloved Community, The Episcopal Church’s long-term commitment to racial healing, reconciliation, and justice in our personal lives, our ministries, and our society.  This series is open to all, and especially designed to help white people talk with other white people. 
 
Participants are invited to peel away the layers that have contributed to the challenges and divides of the present day – all while grounded in our call to faith, hope and love.
 

 

RESPONDING TO RACIAL VIOLENCE AND POLICE BRUTALITY

 

 COMMITTED TO LISTEN:

A PUBLIC READING OF THE REV. DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.'s LETTER FROM BIRMINGHAM JAIL

On April 16, 1963, from his cell in a Birmingham City Jail, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. penned a public letter addressed to several of Alabama's leading white religious leaders, who had openly questioned the pace and the confrontational nature of civil rights demonstrations. Co-hosted by The BTS Center and the Maine Council of Churches, this event included multiple voices, contemplative music and space for reflection, including that of our bishop, The Rt. Rev. Thomas J. Brown. Listen and view the recording here.

 

STATE AND REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS DOING ANTI-RACISM WORK 

 

 

 

143 State Street (mail to PO Box 4036) | Portland, ME 04101-4036 | Phone: (207) 772-1953 |